Precision Ag Survey

May 24, 2022


Planting

Participate in a Study to Identify Major Barriers to Precision Agriculture Technology Adoption
 

The Ohio State University Department of Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering (FABE) is looking for farmers, consultants, and other individuals who work alongside farmers to participate in a survey aimed at identifying major barriers that row crop farmers, consultants, and other personnel involved in crop production face when adopting precision agriculture technologies. Eligible participants must have row cropping operations in Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Texas or preform consulting tasks or other tasks for famers who have row crop operations within the states stated above.

Participants who are interested in participating are required to take the survey found with the link here: https://osu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_201lPMuZxRSESge.

You will have six weeks from April 25, 2022 to June 15, 2022 to respond to the survey. Completing the survey will constitute your consent to participate in the study.
 


Latest Posts

Nov 16,2022

CROPLAN AA varieties show stronger roots, healthier plants, higher yield, and increased stand persistence potential over the life of a stand.

Nov 07,2022
I hope you get the chance to get outside in November. By the time I write the next newsletter, we could see below zero temperatures. Or it could be 70 degrees outside. You just never know. You gotta love Wisconsin. If you don’t like the weather, wait a day.
Nov 07,2022
Temperature fluctuations during winter tend to present challenges for calf raisers across the Midwest and many farms will see an uptick in respiratory issues. More calves are being raised in barns or other housing with greater protection from the elements and these structures rely on natural ventilation to provide clean, fresh air to the calves. This works well in the summertime; however, as doors, windows and curtains are closed in the winter, providing sufficient air exchanges to keep calves healthy can be challenging.

Related Posts