MycoApply EndoPrime SC

May 05, 2022


MycoApply EndoPrime SC

Strong plants start with healthy soil.

Plant health and soil health go hand in hand. The healthier the soil, the stronger the plant.Mycorrhizal fungi use a network of hyphae to help expand a plant’s root zone and access tiny pockets in the soil otherwise inaccessible by root hairs.

What exactly does soil health entail? Soil health, also referred to as soil quality, is the continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living ecosystem that sustains plants, animals and humans.This means managing soils today so they are sustainable for future generations. As an ecosystem, soil contains living organisms that when provided the basic necessities of life — food, water, shelter — perform the necessary functions required to produce food and fiber.

MycoApply EndoPrime SC uses four specially selected species of mycorrhizae designed to improve plant health and soil structure, providing a stronger foundation for continued cropland productivity. Mycorrhizae are fungi that form a network of hyphae to extend the corn root system. They extend the root absorption area of the plant by increasing the size of the network up to 50x. MycoApply EndoPrime SC provides plants with the following:

  1. Improved nutrient access and uptake. Hyphai can access small areas that root hairs can't. They also produce enzumes to release nturiends that are tied up in the soil.
  2. Drought stress tolerance. Mycorrhizae can store resources untilneeded by the plant.
  3. Improved soil structure. Hyphaie produce glomalin, which creates stable soil aggregates for better soil structure.
  4. Expanded root absorption. Hyphae extend from roots to access areas inaccessible to bigger roots.

The journey to bigger yields starts with optimal soil health. Contact your local Premier agronomist today for more information on MycoApply EndoPrime SC.

Ken Jahnke

Sales Manager
 

 

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