Protect Plants From Stress with Biostimulants

Jun 02, 2021


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Toggle® Biostimulant

During the lifespan of a crop, it’s faced with numerous stressors that can chip away at yield. So what can you do to protect plants from stress? It starts with keeping crops healthy from day one with good management practices. Toggle® is a biostimulant fertilizer used in corn, soybeans, cotton and other crops. It’s derived from seaweed and enhances root growth, promotes synthesis of antioxidants and improves photosynthesis by increasing chlorophyll production in plants. 

Biostimulants such as Toggle® help regulate the water balance of the plant, particularly during times of drought or heat stress. This is accomplished by stimulating more responsive stomata, which are responsible for the flow of nutrients and water through the plant, known as stomatal conductance. Essentially, Toggle® helps regulate the flow of water through and out of the plant in a more efficient manner.
 
Toggle® can be used during a range of growth stages from v5 through tasseling, and can be applied multiple times throughout a growing season when conditions warrant it. Biostimulants such as Toggle® have a direct impact on the gene expression of the plant, which means that the optimal timing is to anticipate stress and apply it early-on. However, the product can still benefit plants if applied later on. 

Contact your local Premier agronomist if you have any questions on using Toggle® on your crops.

 

Joel Johanningmeier
Winfield United

 

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